Cannabis Marijuana Use, Alzheimer’s Disease, Prevention, Efficacy, Treatment, Cannabinoids Help Decline in Symptoms

Cannabis Marijuana Use, Alzheimer’s Disease, Prevention, Efficacy, Treatment, Cannabinoids Help Decline in Symptoms

ALZHEIMER’S Peer reviewed Research:

MARIJUANA SLOWS ALZHEIMER’S DECLINE
Europe: Study: Marijuana Slows Alzheimer’s Decline

Marijuana may block Alzheimer’s
BBC NEWS | Health | Marijuana may block Alzheimer’s

Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology by Cannabinoids
Prevention of Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology by Cannabinoids: Neuroprotection Mediated by Blockade of Microglial Activation — Ramírez et al. 25 (8): 1904 — Journal of Neuroscience

Marijuana’s Active Ingredient Shown to Inhibit Primary Marker of Alzheimer’s Disease
AAMC: Marijuana’s Active Ingredient Shown to Inhibit Primary Marker of Alzheimer’s Disease

Safety and efficacy of Dronabinol in the treatment of agitation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease with anorexia
Clinical Studies and Case Reports

Open-label study of Dronabinol in the treatment of refractory agitation in Alzheimer’s disease
Clinical Studies and Case Reports

Effects of dronabinol on anorexia and disturbed behavior in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.
Clinical Studies and Case Reports

Cannabinoids reduce the progression of Alzheimer’s disease in animals
IACM-Bulletin

Molecular Link between the Active Component of Marijuana and Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology
Unbound MEDLINE | A Molecular Link between the Active Component of Marijuana and Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology. Journal article

THC inhibits primary marker of Alzheimer’s disease
IACM-Bulletin

Cannabinoid receptor stimulation is anti-inflammatory and improves memory in old rats
Cannabinoid receptor stimulation is anti-inflammat…[Neurobiol Aging. 2008] – PubMed Result

Alzheimer’s disease; taking the edge off with cannabinoids?
Alzheimer’s disease; taking the edge off with cannabinoids?

US Patent 6630507 – Cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants
Cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants – US Patent 6630507 Abstract

Cannabidiol in vivo blunts β-amyloid induced neuroinflammation by suppressing IL-1β and iNOS expression
Cannabidiol in vivo blunts β-amyloid induced neuroinflammation by suppressing IL-1β and iNOS expression

Inflammation and aging: can endocannabinoids help?
Inflammation and aging: can endocannabinoids help?

Anti-inflammatory property of the cannabinoid agonist WIN-55212-2 in a rodent model of chronic brain inflammation
Anti-inflammatory property of the cannabinoid agonist WIN-55212-2 in a rodent model of chronic brain inflammation

Marijuana reduces memory impairment
Aging – Marijuana reduces memory impairment

Alzheimer’s Disease

Senile dementia - Alzheimer’s type (SDAT); SDAT

Last reviewed: October 4, 2010.

Dementia is a loss of brain function that occurs with certain diseases. Alzheimer’s disease (AD), is one form of dementia that gradually gets worse over time. It affects memory, thinking, and behavior.

Memory impairment, as well as problems with language, decision-making ability, judgment, and personality, are necessary features for the diagnosis.

Causes, incidence, and risk factors

Age and family history are risk factors for AD.

  • As you get older, your risk of developing AD goes up. However, developing Alzheimer’s disease is not a part of normal aging.
  • Having a close blood relative, such as a brother, sister, or parent who developed AD increases your risk.
  • Having certain combination of genes for proteins that appear to be abnormal in Alzheimer’s disease also increases your risk.

Other risk factors that are not as well proven include:

  • Longstanding high blood pressure
  • History of head trauma
  • Female gender

There are two types of AD — early onset and late onset.

  • In early onset AD, symptoms first appear before age 60. Early onset AD is much less common than late onset. However, it tends to progress rapidly. Early onset disease can run in families. Several genes have been identified.
  • Late onset AD, the most common form of the disease, develops in people age 60 and older. Late onset AD may run in some families, but the role of genes is less clear.

The cause of AD is not entirely known, but is thought to include both genetic and environmental factors. A diagnosis of AD is made when certain symptoms are present, and by making sure other causes of dementia are not present.

The only way to know for certain that someone has AD is to examine a sample of their brain tissue after death. The following changes are more common in the brain tissue of people with AD:

  • “Neurofibrillary tangles” (twisted fragments of protein within nerve cells that clog up the cell)
  • “Neuritic plaques” (abnormal clusters of dead and dying nerve cells, other brain cells, and protein)
  • “Senile plaques” (areas where products of dying nerve cells have accumulated around protein).

When nerve cells (neurons) are destroyed, there is a decrease in the chemicals that help nerve cells send messages to one another (called neurotransmitters). As a result, areas of the brain that normally work together become disconnected.

The buildup of aluminum, lead, mercury, and other substances in the brain is no longer believed to be a cause of AD.

Symptoms

Dementia symptoms include difficulty with many areas of mental function, including:

  • Language
  • Memory
  • Perception
  • Emotional behavior or personality
  • Cognitive skills (such as calculation, abstract thinking, or judgment)

Dementia usually first appears as forgetfulness.

Mild cognitive impairment is the stage between normal forgetfulness due to aging, and the development of AD. People with MCI have mild problems with thinking and memory that do not interfere with everyday activities. They are often aware of the forgetfulness. Not everyone with MCI develops AD.

Symptoms of MCI include:

  • Forgetting recent events or conversations
  • Difficulty performing more than one task at a time
  • Difficulty solving problems
  • Taking longer to perform more difficult activities

The early symptoms of AD can include:

  • Language problems, such as trouble finding the name of familiar objects
  • Misplacing items
  • Getting lost on familiar routes
  • Personality changes and loss of social skills
  • Losing interest in things previously enjoyed, flat mood
  • Difficulty performing tasks that take some thought, but used to come easily, such as balancing a checkbook, playing complex games (such as bridge), and learning new information or routines

As the AD becomes worse, symptoms are more obvious and interfere with your ability to take care of yourself. Symptoms can include:

  • Forgetting details about current events
  • Forgetting events in your own life history, losing awareness of who you are
  • Change in sleep patterns, often waking up at night
  • Difficulty reading or writing
  • Poor judgment and loss of ability to recognize danger
  • Using the wrong word, mispronouncing words, speaking in confusing sentences
  • Withdrawing from social contact
  • Having hallucinations, arguments, striking out, and violent behavior
  • Having delusions, depression, agitation
  • Difficulty doing basic tasks, such as preparing meals, choosing proper clothing, and driving

People with severe AD can no longer:

  • Understand language
  • Recognize family members
  • Perform basic activities of daily living, such as eating, dressing, and bathing

Other symptoms that may occur with AD:

Signs and tests

AD can often be diagnosed through a history and physical exam by a skilled doctor or nurse. A health care provider will take a history, do a physical exam (including a neurological exam), and perform a mental status examination.

Tests may be ordered to help determine whether other medical problems could be causing dementia or making it worse. These conditions include:

Computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain may be done to look for other causes of dementia, such as a brain tumor or stroke.

  • In the early stages of dementia, brain image scans may be normal. In later stages, an MRI may show a decrease in the size of different areas of the brain.
  • While the scans do not confirm the diagnosis of AD, they do exclude other causes of dementia (such as stroke and tumor).

Treatment

Unfortunately, there is no cure for AD. The goals in treating AD are to:

  • Slow the progression of the disease (although this is difficult to do)
  • Manage behavior problems, confusion, sleep problems, and agitation
  • Modify the home environment
  • Support family members and other caregivers

DRUG TREATMENT

Most drugs used to treat Alzheimer’s are aimed at slowing the rate at which symptoms become worse. The benefit from these drugs is often small, and patients and their families may not always notice much of a change.

Patients and caregivers should ask their doctors the following questions about whether and when to use these drugs:

  • What are the potential side effects of the medicine and are they worth the risk, given that there will likely be only a small change in behavior or function?
  • When is the best time, if any, to use these drugs in the course of Alzheimer’s disease?

Two types of medicine are available:

  • Donepezil (Aricept), rivastigmine (Exelon), and galantamine (Razadyne, formerly called Reminyl) affect the level of a chemical in the brain called acetylcholine. Side effects include indigestion, diarrhea, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, muscle cramps, and fatigue.
  • Memantine (Namenda) is another type of drug approved for treating AD. Possible side effects include agitation or anxiety.

Other medicines may be needed to control aggressive, agitated, or dangerous behaviors. These are usually given in very low doses.

It may be necessary to stop any medications that make confusion worse. Such medicines may include painkillers, cimetidine, central nervous system depressants, antihistamines, sleeping pills, and others. Never change or stop taking any medicines without first talking to your doctor.

SUPPLEMENTS

Many people take folate (vitamin B9), vitamin B12, and vitamin E. However, there is no strong evidence that taking these vitamins prevents AD or slows the disease once it occurs.

Some people believe that the herb ginkgo biloba prevents or slows the development of dementia. However, high-quality studies have failed to show that this herb lowers the chance of developing dementia. DO NOT use ginkgo if you take blood-thinning medications like warfarin (Coumadin) or a class of antidepressants called monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs).

If you are considering any drugs or supplements, you should talk to your doctor first. Remember that herbs and supplements available over the counter are NOT regulated by the FDA.

Cannabis Documentaries Cannabinoid Facts Marijuana Peer Reviewed Research Links

Cannabis TV Documentaries

Weed Wars on the Discovery Channel Episode 4 Season 1

Weed Wars on the Discovery Channel Episode 3 Season 1

Weed Wars on the Discovery Channel Episode 2 Season 1

Weed Wars on the Discovery Channel Episode 1 Season 1

Prohibition a Ken Burns Documentary on PBS

PBS FRONTLINE The Pot Republic

Montana PBS Special Clearing the Smoke: The Science of Cannabis

Hemp for Victory

Reefer Madness

“She Shoulda Said ‘No’!” (also known as Wild Weed)

Marijuana ( Marihuana ) The Devil’s Weed Cannabis Propaganda film (1936)

Marihuana The Assassin of Youth 1935 Anti-Marijuana Propaganda Film

The BEST Cannabis / Marijuana Propaganda Films / Movies of ALL TIME!

Marijuana: A Chronic History Presented by the History Channel

NGC’s Drugs Inc.: Marijuana

NGC’s Marijuana Nation

PBS’ Botany of Desire

CNBC’s Marijuana Inc.

TEA Party Eat your Heart Out!! The Bundy’s Were Here 1st!!

Links:

Find The Best Medical Marijuana in Montana Potency Tested

Exploring the Endocannabinoid System Cannabinoids and their Therapeutic Potentials

Peer Reviewed Research

Hemp for Victory, 1942 U.S. WWII Propoganda Film, and State by State Industrial Hemp Laws

MMJ Clinics / Doctors Recommendations

MMJ Dispensaries/Caregivers: Find Them Here

MMJ Strains / Varieties: Find Them Here Potency Tested

Ed Rosenthal Runs For President in 2012? Stephen’s Colbert SuperPac Funding?

Fastest way to determine cannabis seedling sex!

Grow Buddy Thin Layer Chromatography THC, CBD test kit

Grow Buddy Instructional Video

Grow Buddy Replacement T.L.C. Supplies

Plant DNA Collection Kit

Montana Biotech Products and Services

Cannabinoid Facts

Specialist Want Regulations / Oversight of Medical Marijuana Analysis Labs, Montana Biotech Embraces Open Dialog

Cannalytics™ Cannabinoid Fingerprinting Test by Alpha Nova vs Grow Buddy™ at Home THC, CBD, CBN Test Kit by Montana Biotech Comparing Two Competing Thin Layer Chromatography T.L.C Methods

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Ed Rosenthal and the Party-Party’s Platform for America 2012!

A Little Ed History and Education! Wiki Style!

Peer Reviewed Research:

ADD /ADHD, Medical Marijuana and its potential Treatment.

Addiction Risk-Physical of using Medical Marijuana.

Alcoholism and Medical Marijuana.

ALS, Lou Gehrig’s Disease Medical Cannabis Therapy

Cannabis Marijuana Use and AMOTIVATIONAL SYNDROME

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Medical Cannabis Marijuana and ANTI-INFLAMMATORY PROPERTIES of Cannabinoids

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Medical Cannabis Marijuana and ANTI-INFLAMMATORY PROPERTIES of Cannabinoids

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APPETITE STIMULANT Medical Marijuana Cannabis and It’s Effects on Hunger the Munchies

ARTHRITIS Cannabis Marijuana and the Effects of Cannabinoids for Treatment

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BRAIN INJURIES and the NEUROPROTECTANT Properties and Therapeutic Effects of Medical Cannabis Marijuana Cannabinoids Tetrahydrocannabinol THC and Cannabidiol CBD

Breast Cancer Antitumor Effects Inhibition of Cancer Cell Proliferation and Treatment Using Medical Cannabis Marijuana Derived Cannabinoids Tetrahydrocannabinol  Cannabidiol  Cannabigerol Cannabichromene Cannabidiol Acid and THC Acid

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